3/4 Would Seek An Organ Donor But Only 1/4 Would Donate

Three-quarters of Bulgarians would seek transplantation when needed, but only one-third would consent to organ donation. This shows a survey conducted at the end of September through 800 interviews, commissioned by the Ministry of Health. The survey was carried out by the sociological agency Alpha Research.

According to 57 percent of the participants, citizens do not agree to donate, as they fear that in the event of an incident, the medical team would not take sufficient care to save the person concerned. Over 40 percent of those surveyed think that donation is not widespread because of people’s fears to “tempt fate” and 34 percent think that people “don’t want to think about fatal things.” Nearly one in five of those interviewed believe that donation is being avoided for moral-religious reasons. The lower the education and social status of the people, the higher the superstition.

Currently, 35.2 percent of people declare their consent to become donors in the event of an incident. Over 50 percent believe that people have to declare their wish for donation on their own. Currently, the Bulgarian legislation requires an explicit declaration of donation waiver.

The more the subject is talked about in the family, the more the proportion of people who are willing to consent to organ donation after their death or after the death of a loved one increases. Only 12 percent of the Bulgarians have talked about donation with their family and loved ones. For comparison 40 percent of the people in other EU countries have talked about donation with their family and loved ones. Nearly 60 percent of adult Bulgarians say they have never read any information about organ donation.